Often I am asked where is the best place have a homestead.   That’s a question that only YOU can answer for yourself.  There are just so many factors to take into consideration.

homesteading in michigan

Click here to go to the state-by-state pages with guides to a lot of factors – such as climate, geography, building codes, homestead laws, homeschooling (‘Where to Homestead” pages)

 

On a broader scale, here is some information that is country wide.

Where to homestead – a US broader view

Where to homesteadClimate

The country is divided into a number of climate zones.  You can find the descriptions of each of these zones here.    For more detailed data for states you can click here.

 

 

 

us_precipRainfall (average Precipitation)

State maps of average rainfall for the USA (Hawai is not included here).

 

 

 

 

lightning map

Thunderstorms & Lightning

Excellent information on severe storm rates across the nation.

 

 

 

Where to homesteadPlant Hardiness Zones

The 2012 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map is the standard by which gardeners and growers can determine which plants are most likely to thrive at a location. The map is based on the average annual minimum winter temperature, divided into 10-degree F zones.   You can click on each state to get a more detailed map.

 

 

Where to homesteadPopulation

This site has all the US states listed.  Click on the state you are interested in and then you can zoom in on the map.  You can see the size of towns and their population density of areas.

 

 

 

 

 

US soils map

Soils

This soils map of the United States was created from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization digital soils map of the world. On it soils are classified into zones based on a a number of ‘agronomic’ factors. Soils with a high number of limiting factors are problematic and require remediation for agricultural production – so zone -8. The best soils for agriculture have no or few limiting factors – so zone -0.

 

 

 

US GovenorsPolitics

This is a Map of the political breakdown of the country based on the party of the standing Governor for each state (pre 2016).  You can find further breakdowns based on state and federal voting here.  This link is current data post 2016 election.

 

 

 

 

 

USHomeschoolingHomeschooling

Each state has a different set of rules and regulations for those who want to home school their children.  This map shows the the situation state-by-state for the level of regulation.  See the “Where to Homestead” state breakdowns for more information.
ACTION States requiring no notice
WATCH States with low regulation
UPDATE States with moderate regulation
UPDATEState with high regulation

Click here for more US maps  – crime, gun ownership, thefts


 I hope all this information will assist you to select the very best location for you to start on your homesteading journey.

Where to homestead in the USA

22 thoughts on “Where to homestead in the USA

  • August 22, 2015 at 9:46 am
    Permalink

    I think an average rainfall map would help pull everything together…

    Reply
    • August 22, 2015 at 9:52 am
      Permalink

      Great idea…I will find and add one.

      Reply
  • November 28, 2015 at 8:14 pm
    Permalink

    the soil map does not show any state lines so cant tell for sure where some places are that i might be interested in

    Reply
  • Pingback: Where To Homestead In The USA - SHTF & Prepping Central

  • December 6, 2015 at 1:23 pm
    Permalink

    Taxes, cost per acre, building codes/zoning laws all are very important!

    Reply
  • December 17, 2015 at 8:06 pm
    Permalink

    I am a urban homesteader here in Macon, GA. Live on 1/4 ac. Lots of rain, great temperatures, soil needs very little admendments, planted first veggie garden this year and it was hugh success. Moved here 1 year ago. City allows chickens and bee keeping, will be adding those this next year also.

    Reply
    • March 17, 2016 at 1:21 am
      Permalink

      Hi Lori. Our names are April and George. We live in Byron and have been considering homesteading in the area as well. We would love to talk to you about pros and cons before we get too invested. We would love it if you would contact us at georgebrown322@gmail.com to chat further!
      Thanks, G and A

      Reply
    • September 5, 2016 at 1:46 pm
      Permalink

      I lived in Macon for seven years and gardened on an acre of land. I then spent seven years in Crawford county (just outside Macon) homesteading on 13 acres. I found growing anything to be a hit and miss affair due to insects, high humidity which caused much fungal growth on tomato plants, and other crops, animal predation etc.. I had entire crops wiped out by continual rain or late frosts. High temperatures during summer (mid 90’s to 105 degrees) could simply fry certain crops in the ground. At times, the humidity was so intense it was like breathing water. I had heat exhaustion twice. Also, termites will eat the wood frame of any house, which means you must have termite protection around your dwelling. Heatwave warnings were often in effect and there is no way a person can survive without air conditioning. Add to the above the crime rate in that part of the country (17 homicides in Macon since the beginning of 2016) plus the racial politics and you have a pretty uncongenial area.

      Reply
  • December 18, 2015 at 3:05 am
    Permalink

    I would think fault lines and their activity would be useful as well

    Reply
  • December 26, 2015 at 4:32 pm
    Permalink

    great info
    humidity ( I hate humidity) , fracking and mining would also be helpful to make a choice

    Reply
    • December 26, 2015 at 5:14 pm
      Permalink

      Great ideas. Many thanks 🙂

      Reply
  • January 16, 2016 at 10:57 am
    Permalink

    The homeschool map is outdated. Iowa has changed the laws.

    Reply
    • January 16, 2016 at 4:33 pm
      Permalink

      as soon as an updated map comes out I will add a link to it. Many thanks for pointing it out.

      Reply
  • May 6, 2016 at 7:29 pm
    Permalink

    I would also like to see a map of Fracking areas before I decide where to homestead. Otherwise- this is a GREAT resource! Thanks!

    Reply
    • May 6, 2016 at 7:51 pm
      Permalink

      Great suggestion….I think you will be surprised the size of the area. I will find the best map and add it to the mix.

      Reply
  • September 5, 2016 at 2:20 pm
    Permalink

    One thing I have found to be quite unreliable over the past several years are the climate maps produced by the government. I speak primarily about the southeast, central Georgia in particular, but it could probably be applied nationwide. Whether you accept the theory of global warming or not, one must be willfully blind not to see that the weather is becoming more unpredictable. The average highs shown for the Macon area are very often exceeded, rendering it virtually impossible to work outside, unless you want sunstroke. Precipitation measures also no longer seem to be accurate; it can rain, and I mean real downpours, for weeks on end. Flooding is common on many rivers and creeks. Humidity gives a real feel of at least 8-10 degrees more than the stated temperature. My point is that research on the Internet is not going to give an accurate description of a particular area; you must actually go to a place to experience the different seasons to see if homesteading is even viable.

    Reply
    • March 21, 2017 at 8:52 am
      Permalink

      Average highs should be exceeded about half the time. That is what average means.

      Reply
  • March 20, 2017 at 11:48 am
    Permalink

    Along with homeschooling, midwifery (homebirth) laws are vitally important. Most Homesteaders like to do things naturally which includes homebirth. In some states it’s illegal.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *